Alcoholics Anonymous

About Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. AA is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organisation or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

We in AA are men and women who have discovered, and admitted, that we cannot control alcohol. We have learned that we must live without it if we are to avoid disaster for ourselves and those close to us.

Pathways Covered

Alcohol

Overview

In simplest form, the AA program operates when a recovered alcoholic passes along the story of his or her own problem drinking, describes the sobriety he or she has found in AA, and invites the newcomer to join the informal Fellowship.

The heart of the suggested program of personal recovery is contained in Twelve Steps describing the experience of the earliest members of the Society:

What we do

Open Meetings

As the term suggests, meetings of this type are open to alcoholics and their families and to anyone interested in solving a personal drinking problem or helping someone else to solve such a problem.

Most open meetings follow a more or less set pattern. A chairperson describes the AA program and introduces one, two or three speakers who relate their personal drinking histories. Midway through the meeting there is usually a period for local AA announcements, and a treasurer passes the hat to defray costs of the meeting hall, literature, and incidental expenses.

Guests at AA open meetings are reminded that any opinions or interpretations they may hear are solely those of the speaker involved. All members are free to interpret the recovery program in their own terms, but none can speak for the local group or for AA as a whole.

Closed Meetings

These meetings are limited to alcoholics and those who think or know they have a problem with drinking. They provide an opportunity for members to relate their experiences with one another on problems related to drinking patterns and attempts to achieve stable sobriety.

Where we do it

You can access AA meetings in a number of areas across Avon and Somerset. You the main website link on this page to search for where and how you can access your local AA groups.

If you live in Somerset, the Somerset Drug and Alcohol Partnership maintains a directory of AA groups in Somerset. To access the Somerset AA directory, click here.

How to access

You can call the AA helpline on 0845 769 7555 or email at help@alcoholics-anonymous.org.uk You can also use the main website link on this page to find out full details of your local groups.

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